Monday, November 14, 2011

Suggested Reading: "How Google Makes Algorithm Changes"

If you are involved with organic search engine marketing, and your lead generating is thriving or suffering depending upon how the search engine gods treat your webpages, then you should read this informative and  eye-opening blog by Jennifer Ledbetter, otherwise known at as the author of "PotPieGirl.com".
Results by Algorithms, Computers, Humans?
In October 2011 she wrote an excellent blog offering insight into how Google engages in the complex work of making search engine algorithm changes, and on a little known fact that the human factor is applied as a sort of sanity check. Yes, the Android company will utilize humanoids as needed to check on computeroid algorithms. 
Google Search can be your "best friend" in SEM (it is very often for me), or your most stubborn "opponent" (ditto). Best to get to know Google as well as you can. Don't take it personally. This blog from Jennifer provides some great learning material.
What this particular blog posting on Google algorithm change processes will not do is help you write clear, concise, precise, and relevant content which will soar to the top of organic search engine rankings... there are no miraculous short-cuts and no SEO voodoo magic juice is available. But her fascinating blog will give you an interesting look at how Google works. Know your frenemy!
Google is not unlike a secretive government agency - - it must be deliberately murky, cloaked, vague, and always focused on keeping high relevancy in search results. This is a core mission. This is why Google is the number one search engine in the world. Thus, Google is always looking for spam and ways to eradicate it. This is why Google is always changing the search "rules" to keep a healthy advantage over the collective efforts of millions of clever people attempting to manipulate organic search results via SEO, seeking to gain top rank positions "deservedly" or not. 

Visit www.potpiegirl.com to see more of Jennifer's work and services. Jennifer has a healthy fascination with Google's inner workings. We need enthusiastic people like her to help shed a little light behind the mysterious Mountain View curtain.